A Day in the Life of Nikki Kline: Vacation

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vacation dog

It’s vacation time!

As much as we enjoy our job, we occasionally take some time away and run off to new and exciting places. Sadly our own pets can’t always join us, which, at least for me, means that I’m getting a vacation from the “kids”.

My pre-vacation starts with a multiple page list of care instructions for my pet sitter. I should note, she probably would not need any instructions, as she has been watching my crew for multiple years, and they are pretty low maintenance (knock on wood). However, it makes my life less stressful to have: any number I can be reached at, at least two (usually more, I may be a bit compulsive) emergency contacts, all their microchip information, and feeding and medication instructions available. (Just in case my pet sitter comes down with amnesia.) As well as, god forbid, there be an emergency situation, I would prefer her not to need to search through her entire phone and have to guess which other people I have put on emergency standby.

During vacation, I go through a bit of pet withdrawal, because I am used to spending basically twenty-four hours a day with at least some sort of animal around me. What this means for anyone walking by with a pet ( I don’t specify dog, because I’ve also stopped to pet cats, ferrets and other exotics on leashes) is that I’m probably going to be asking them if it’s ok to pet them. And if they aren’t in a rush and I’m not getting to evil of looks from Kyle, I will get at least a few stories about them and play with them for a few minutes.

Also, I’m always on stray watch, which is particularly hard in different countries where they just have random animals wondering everywhere. In Belize, one particular dog chose wisely when picking his favorite chair to lay on, most people would be a bit grumpy if tackled by a 60-ish pound lab mix while sunbathing, but he picked the area with three vet techs who loved the snuggle time (please ignore the crazy tan lines you get when a dog is partially laying on you while sunning).
I also can spot veterinary hospitals like a champ. (This is a much more useful skill when I have one of my pets with me, but my brain doesn’t discriminate.)

Just because I’m not at work doesn’t mean I’m not looking out for a pet’s best interest. I have stalked in and out of restaurants while having dinner to make sure someone wasn’t leaving their dog in the car or tied to a post for more than a few moments. I had Kyle pull over the car to try to catch the cat that looked injured, (but could still seem to run well) and during our most recent trip, I tried to stop someone from putting the pet they brought on the plane in the overhead luggage compartment. (I will happily note the flight attendant was on the dog in the overhead luggage before I needed to say anything.)

Although I love traveling, I’m always excited to come home to my crew and, believe it or not, to work as well. It’s the best feeling in the world when you get home to a wagging tail and purrs when you walk through the door. I’ll even accept Norbert’s constant winding between my legs, begging for pets or trying to trip me with a smile. The first day back to work, I try to catch up on everyone that was in the hospital when I left. I want to see how they are feeling now or check-in on any of the “frequent flyers” to make sure they haven’t decided to have any new issues we will need to know about.

Nikki Kline, Veterinary Technician
French Creek Veterinary Hospital
www.frenchcreekvet.com

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Have you thanked the animal shelter in your neighborhood lately?

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Lucky

This is Lucky, a dog adopted from a rural shelter after he was found wandering in the woods on his own.

This week is Animal shelter & rescue appreciation week. November is also Adopt a Senior Pet Month. I love when things come together so nicely. Like we talked about in the last post on Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, there are many reasons to consider adopting a shelter animal. In addition to needing a good home and someone to love them, I genuinely believe that rescue animals are more appreciative. Like the memory of being in a run with a concrete floor and 95 dogs all barking at once or being a cat stuffed in a cage with 10 others doesn’t leave them once they get to their new home. 3 of the 4 dogs I’ve had in my life have been rescues, and they are totally worth it.

Maybe you don’t have time or room for a pet right now. You can always donate to the shelter of your choice whom you think is doing a great job or volunteer your time to help with the animals or answer phones.

To anyone who has adopted a senior pet from either a shelter or a friend, I salute you. These animals often get overlooked when people are shopping for a new pet because who doesn’t love a puppy or a kitten. But senior pets have a lot of love to give too, and you might be surprised how well they will blend into your home. They are already potty trained, leash trained, know at least basic commands and have probably calmed down a lot from their puppy or kitten-hood. In addition, they probably don’t even know why their in a shelter to begin with. Maybe their owner passed away, hit hard times or had to move away. There are many possibilities.

Here are some great links if you want to investigate a little more.

Top 10 reasons to adopt an older dog

Pet statistics in the US

Questions to ask yourself before adopting