Keep your felines safe during Cat Health Month

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CatHealthFebruary is Cat Health Month. Use these resources from PVMA to keep America’s number 1 pet happy and healthy all year long.

Things to Consider Before Getting a Cat fact sheet
Think you’re ready to get a cat? Use this fact sheet to see if you’ve considered all the factors.

Feline Lifestyle Assessment
Having a complete picture of your cat or kitten’s life can help your veterinarian provide better treatment and recommendations for your cat.

Feline-ality Cat Personality Matching
Use this tool from the ASPCA to assess your preferences and expectations when thinking of adopting a new cat.

Bringing Home a New Kitten
A new kitten can be exciting. Start life with your new friend off on the right foot with proper veterinary care, nutrition, and socialization.

kitten jumping

The Importance of Preventive Care
Think your pet only needs to see the veterinarian when something’s wrong? Learn how regular visits can prevent illness instead.

Traveling and Moving With Your Cat
Traveling with cats is legendary – for all the wrong reasons. Learn how to make is less stressful and safe.

Cats and Lilies fact sheet
In addition to other plants, lilies are particularly poisonous to cats. Learn how to prevent accidental ingestion and what to do if it happens.

Spaying and Neutering
Did you know? Spaying and neutering prevents pet overpopulation while also keeping your cat healthy. ​

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How responsible of a dog owner are you?

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relaxing with the dogSeptember is Responsible Pet Ownership Month. Sounds boring, right? But it’s important!

It’s easy to think of your furry friend as part of the family, one of the kids, (a holy terror… ), but it’s also easy to forget that they are totally dependent on you. For everything. So make the most of it and go above and beyond for Fido! Here are some of the topics of our fact sheets for pet owners that can help you keep on top of things.

Dog Licensing – As they say, it’s not just bling, it’s the law! All dogs three months or older must be licensed by January 1 of each year. If you’ve ever walked or driven your neighborhood calling out your lost dog’s name with the hope you’ll see him running toward you or visited your local animal shelter and registered your pet as missing, you know the importance of a dog license.

Dog Bite Prevention –  Nothing goes better together than kids and dogs but unfortunately, kids are also more likely to get bitten. Often it’s just a matter of not understanding how to interact safely with a dog, especially one that isn’t yours.
We have to be able to read body language and understand nuances that tell us what the dog might be thinking.

Preventive Care – Think your dog only needs to go to the vet when something is wrong? Think again. Prevent it from happening in the first place by scheduling regular annual appointments. Regular check ups can prevent bigger problems later which could be much more expensive.

Dental Health – Dog breath? It could be the sign of something more serious. Periodontal disease in our pets is the most common health problem that veterinarians see, yet many pet owners are still in the dark about preventing it or treating it. Don’t think that because your pet isn’t showing signs of oral discomfort that everything is fine. Untreated oral disease can be dangerous to your pet’s health and much more expensive to correct down the road than paying for preventive measures now.

Canine Influenza – Like many viruses, canine influenza is spread through respiratory secretions and contaminated surfaces of everything from food and water bowls to leashes to toys. What’s more, it can stay alive up to 48 hours on surfaces, 24 hours on clothing, and up to 12 hours on hands. If a dog comes in contact with the virus, it can be 2-4 days before it exhibits signs of feeling ill, and the dog is also most contagious during this time.

And there are many more, so check out our fact sheets for yourself and see how else you can keep your dogs happy and healthy.

Now, go ahead. Put your feet up and do a little relaxing with Rover.

April is Prevention of Lyme Disease in Dogs Month

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tick

tick

Ok, so April has quite a few things attached to it (Prevent of cruelty to animals, Pet first aid awareness, etc.), but for today’s purposes, we’re preventing lyme disease! Or trying to. As this week – here in Central PA anyway – is the first week that’s had any hint of spring to it at all. Your dogs are likely itching to get outside and play, and unfortunately, so are the ticks.

So what is Lyme Disease anyway?
Lyme disease is a bacterial disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi (boar-ELL-ee-uh burg-dorf-ERR-eye). Within 1 to 2 weeks of being infected, people may have a “bull’s-eye” rash with fever, headache, and muscle or joint pain. Some people have Lyme disease and do not have any early symptoms. Other people have a fever and other “flu-like” symptoms without a rash.

After several days or weeks, the bacteria may spread throughout the body of an infected person. These people can get symptoms such as rashes in other parts of the body, pain that seems to move from joint to joint, and signs of inflammation of the heart or nerves. If the disease is not treated, a few patients can get additional symptoms, such as swelling and pain in major joints or mental changes, months after getting infected.

How can I protect myself from Lyme disease?

  • Whenever possible, you should avoid entering areas that are likely to be infested with ticks, particularly in spring and summer when nymphal ticks feed.
  • If you are in an area with ticks, you should wear light-colored clothing so that ticks can be spotted more easily and removed before becoming attached.
  • If you are in an area with ticks, wear long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your pants into socks. You may also want to wear high rubber boots (since ticks are usually located close to the ground).

For more information on protecting yourself and your pets from Lyme disease, download our PVMA Lyme Disease fact sheet with more precautions and information. Learn more about Lyme disease, including answers to frequently asked questions, the natural history of Lyme disease and a narrated documentary at CDC’s Lyme disease website at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme.  

It’s Poison Prevention Week – How Much Do You Know?

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Lilies are extremely poisonous to cats.

Lilies are extremely poisonous to cats.

Happy Poison Prevention Week!

We’re going to cut to the chase and address some of the ways our furry friends can become sick and how to prevent it. I guarantee you some of these possibilities are downright scary as many of them include things in and around your home. Let’s get started.

Cats and lilies don’t mix
Everyone thinks of dog as the ones who will eat anything – and they will – but cats can be sneaky too. Many forms of lilies are extremely poisonous to cats. Some of the most dangerous are known as the Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter, or Japanese show lily, resulting in acute kidney failure when eaten. Just 2-3 leaves or lily pollen groomed off the fur and ingested can be enough to poison your pet. While it won’t cause kidney failure in dogs, ingesting enough will cause some stomach issues.
GET OUR PVMA FACT SHEET


Poisonous plants

Most people think of pesticides or other common household substances can be poisonous to pets but don’t consider that common indoor and outdoor plants and fruit leaves can be equally toxic. What follows is not a comprehensive list but can help you keep your pets safe around plants that can harm them. If you suspect that your pet has ingested any toxic substance, contact your veterinarian, emergency animal clinic, or poison control center immediately. Keep these important numbers by the phone or on the refrigerator so that you can find them easily during an emergency.
GET OUR PVMA FACT SHEET


Household items

Endless things in the home could pose a danger to your pet, but human medications generally top the list as the most ingested. Keeping medications as well as household cleaners, first aid items, antifreeze, and other chemicals should always be kept out of reach of pets. Even harmless seeming items like chewing gum, caffeine, and some fruits and vegetables can be deadly. Click here to view a more complete list from Pet Poison Helpline.
Pet Poison Helpline
As always, Pet Poison Helpline has an enormous amount of resources in it’s Pet Owner arsenal so that you can better educate yourself to prevent accidental poisonings. They also have a toll-free number – 855-764-7661 – which you can call anytime if you suspect your pet has been poisoned, or call your veterinarian.

A little bit of everything

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japaneseboyI’ve got more than one timely thing I want to touch on, so I’ll just touch on them all! (After all it’s Friday, I can do what I want.)

This Sunday, September 28, is World Rabies Day. While most of us in the US get our dogs and cats vaccinated and then think that rabies is mostly left to the odd wildlife creature, in poorer and less developed countries, rabies is a real threat. Especially to children who are more likely to get bitten. In the Pan-American region, Haiti in particular has a big rabies problem in dogs that roam freely, and the sad fact is that with vaccines, it’s 100% preventable. Click here to learn more about what’s being done from the American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMF) and make a donation if you so choose. A $20 donation buys the vaccine for 50 dogs – that’s a lot.

September is also Disaster Preparedness Month. Disaster preparedness can take many shapes, but in terms of PVMA, we’re thinking about having a plan for the whole family – including pets – if a disaster would happen. Make a plan of where you would stay if you had to leave your home and had to take your pets with you. Do you have their medications? Do they fit in the car? Do you have a pet-friendly place you can stay? Things we take for granted everyday can suddenly become a huge problem during an emergency. Click here to view our disaster preparedness fact sheet and get some ideas of where you need help.

Friday fun! Here are some random things that I like and hope you will too. Have a great weekend!

March 16-22 is National Poison Prevention Week

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PoisonDogThink of this post as the Mr. Yuck for pets. March 16-22 is National Poison Prevention Week and the majority of resources available are aimed at protecting your children, so we at PVMA thought we’d give you a little help with protecting your pets! Take our poll at the end of this post to see which preparations you’re making.

First and foremost, be cognizant of the fact that your home is full of hazards, both inside and out. No, this doesn’t mean you’re a bad pet parent. Pets – especially dogs – are curious creatures and often investigate new things by tasting and eating them. Many plants in your yard or potted plants in the house can be poisonous, as can cut flowers like lilies. Like you would do with small kids, keep household cleaners, toiletries, and medicines out of reach. You know they aren’t food but your pet doesn’t. Also take special care in the kitchen. Everyone knows chocolate is poisonous, but so are many other foods and even chewing gum. Things like onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes and raisins, salt and yeast dough all can have bad consequences if ingested. I know if can seem like a treat to feed your pet people food, but stick to the pet food and treats that are designed for them. PVMA has a number of fact sheets which might be helpful on these topics – be sure to check them out and download for free.

Having a pet first aid kit stocked and at the ready can also be beneficial if you suspect your pet has been poisoned or is injured. Pet Poison Helpline, a fantastic web resource for pet safety, also has a number you can call -1.800.213.6680 – if you suspect that your pet has been poisoned. Keep it on your refrigerator and in any first aid kit that you create. Below is a list of items you might want to include in your first aid kit but remember, it’s very important to call Pet Poison Helpline or your veterinarian before giving any of these remedies yourself at home. The treatment will depend on the type of animal, the size, what was ingested, and what symptoms are being displayed.

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3 percent used to induce vomiting in dogs– make sure it’s not expired
  • Oral dosing syringe or turkey baster – for administering hydrogen peroxide
  • Teaspoon/tablespoon set – for measuring appropriate amount of hydrogen peroxide
  • Liquid hand dish washing detergent, such as Dawn or Palmolive
  • Rubber or latex gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment, like Neosporin™
  • Vitamin E (a small container of oil or several gel caps)
  • Diphenhydramine tablets 25mg – with NO other combination ingredients
  • Ophthalmic saline solution or artificial tears
  • Can of tuna packed in water or tasty canned pet food
  • Sweet electrolyte-containing beverage
  • Corn syrup (1/4 cup)
  • Vegetable oil (1/2 cup)

You can visit the Pet Poison Helpline website to learn much more about pet safety as well as facts, products, tips and recalls. They also have a mobile app for your iPhone so you can have information on the go.

Pets are part of our families and we want them to stay safe. With a few small steps to prepare, you can rest a little easier in case something happens.